Your Role in Effective Business Planning: Know When to Take it Offline

An important role in effective association planning is to keep things moving smoothly, so whenever you are working with a group of people and progress becomes stagnant, you feel bogged down, or when a high level of agreement on a certain point is required, it might be a good idea to take the details off-line.

When this happens we recommend the following:

  • Call a break, and talk to the boss – or better yet talk to the 2 or 3 people that are causing the deadlock, and ask them how they propose to solve it so the group can move forward. This works like a charm.
  • Ask who would like to work out the details and bring back a proposal to move forward.
  • “Park” the item to the end of a meeting, or a later date.
  • Suggest that you will take the item off line, and propose a solution.
  • Put a place holder in your document, and keep writing. Highlight it, so you remember to come back to it later.
  • Strive for “conditional agreement”. In a recent executive planning session, an exceptional facilitator asked our non-agreeing participants to list the conditions for success that everyone would need to see in order to agree to the proposal on the table. This not only highlighted the hesitation in the room, but also allowed us to move forward.

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Best Practices for Effective Vision Statement Sessions – Part 2

Last week we discussed the importance of a strong practical vision statement and 5 ways to go about facilitating sessions for it. Here is some continued insight into association planning and executing effective vision statement sessions for your team.

 

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Work in a group:

From experience I can tell you that articulating a practical vision statement is nearly impossible with only 1-3 people. There really is incredible synergy in the wisdom of a group. These leaders will need to define and execute the strategy to achieve the vision, and if they had a role in the creation of the vision, the chances of successful execution are much higher.

Include the right people:

The vision is owned by the senior team of any organization, in particular the CEO or ED. If the entire senior team can’t make it to the session, reschedule.

Take it off-site:

Take your team somewhere you won’t be distracted by everything that goes on in the office. Just getting away really helps give everyone a fresh perspective. In many of the organizations I work with, taking the team off-site sends a signal to the teams, and the other employees, that the work is important.

Work from the bottom up:

Although the overall process is more or less top down, describing the practical vision of the organization is the wrong time for a top down exercise. Using all of the techniques listed here, brainstorm as many components of the future state of the organization as possible, and then group all the things that fit together to come up with the main components of your practical vision statement. This not only makes a better statement, it ensures that everyone is heard, and that the vision of a few people isn’t forced on everyone.

Forget about spin:

This is a confidential session of the organization’s most senior people, which means everything should be on the table, and nothing should be sacred. Very specifically tell your participants that it is their job to articulate the true, raw, vision of the future. Repackaging and communicating the practical vision statement is a job for another day. When you see spin happening during your session, do your best to stop it, your participants will thank you later.

Stay away from strategy:

Although the practical vision statement is part of strategic planning, this is not a strategy. I can’t express how important this is: The practical vision is a statement of what the organization looks like at a specific point in time in the future. How we will get there will come later in our process. The entire business plan will depend on the foundation of a practical vision statement, so make sure it is solid.

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Best Practices for Effective Vision Statement Sessions

In the past we’ve discussed how the start of a new year is a great opportunity for association leaders to revisit an organization’s strategic plan. More specifically, it’s the perfect time to refresh and strengthen your organization’s vision statement.

A good vision statement is an essential element of every good business plan, and should take priority when it comes to proper association planning. A successful vision statement articulates what your organization aims to be and what the organization will look like in the future. Take caution though, they can easily become overused, abused, and the most poorly written part of your business. We’ve laid out what a good vision statement looks like here.

In order to help you create a strong and practical vision statement, we recommend facilitating a group session. Be sure to ask specific questions, as it is easy to be vague when discussing the future. These 5 practices will help your team articulate an exceptional vision statement:

 

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Be specific about the date:

Depending on the length of your planning horizon, ask them to think about an exact date (ex: 3 years from today). Be specific of what day of the week it is and where they are. Don’t just ask them to think about the future.

Be specific about success:

Most vision statements paint a positive view of the future. Ideally, your vision statement will too, but you must ensure that participants are specific about what a successful future state looks like. If they make a statement that fits our view of a practical vision, but is too vague to be useful, then prompt them to be more specific. Your participants should be able to specifically articulate what success will look like in the future, otherwise the vision won’t be practical.

Use a third party view:

Whenever possible, encourage your participants to talk about what others would see if they looked at the organization in (3) years’ time, for example. One of the most effective scenarios I’ve used is to help them imagine that a newspaper article has been written about the association in the future. You can then ask them in specific terms to describe what is written in the article. I find this small trick allows for more honest, practical, and reasonable responses.

Take a future view:

Again, asking your participants to think about the future is vague. Instead, ask them to imagine that the future is already here. Statements about the future are more reasonable when participants really try to imagine they have already arrived at that future state – especially when combined with the practices described above

Get personal:

Have the participants imagine themselves within the future state they have described. By picturing themselves as part of the vision, your participants will be more specific, realistic, and optimistic about the future.